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The Court and Camp of Runjeet Singh
Date: 1840
Materials: Printed book with engraved illustrations
Dimensions: H. 9 1/4 in x W. 6 1/8 in, H. 22.9 cm x W. 15.2 cm
Credit Line: Gift of the Kapany Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Books And Manuscripts
Object Number: 1998.67
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 6
Culture: Sikh

Description

Label: Osborne, the military secretary to the governor-general of India (Emily Eden’s brother), was part of an official English mission sent to secure an alliance with the Sikhs. Extracts from Osborne’s personal journal, with sixteen of his drawings, were published in 1840. Osborne admired Maharaja Ranjit Singh, describing him as “a ruler, whom the peculiar position of his kingdom, as well as his own extraordinary character, have rendered an object of more than ordinary interest.”

Osborne’s comments in the book’s preface suggest that though he was in India at a politically important moment in history, the general populace in England was indifferent to the experiences of English diplomats, officials, and soldiers in India. Osborne hoped, with some self-deprecating cynicism, that his work could “afford one moment’s amusement to those who, blessed in the enjoyment of all the comforts of their native land, can little guess the shifts to which their less fortunate and exiled countrymen are reduced, to pass the tedious hours of a hot and sultry day, on the burning plains of the East.”

More Information

Exhibition History: The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms
"The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms", Royal Ontario Museum, 5/25/2000 - 8/20/2000
Label: Osborne, the military secretary to the governor-general of India (Emily Eden’s brother), was part of an official English mission sent to secure an alliance with the Sikhs. Extracts from Osborne’s personal journal, with sixteen of his drawings, were published in 1840. Osborne admired Maharaja Ranjit Singh, describing him as “a ruler, whom the peculiar position of his kingdom, as well as his own extraordinary character, have rendered an object of more than ordinary interest.”

Osborne’s comments in the book’s preface suggest that though he was in India at a politically important moment in history, the general populace in England was indifferent to the experiences of English diplomats, officials, and soldiers in India. Osborne hoped, with some self-deprecating cynicism, that his work could “afford one moment’s amusement to those who, blessed in the enjoyment of all the comforts of their native land, can little guess the shifts to which their less fortunate and exiled countrymen are reduced, to pass the tedious hours of a hot and sultry day, on the burning plains of the East.”
Exhibition History: The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms
"The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms", Royal Ontario Museum, 5/25/2000 - 8/20/2000