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Wrapping cloth (bojagi) with golden horse motif
Place of Origin: Korea
Date: probably 1930–1940
Historical Period: Japanese colonial period (1910-1945)
Materials: Silk
Dimensions: H. 32 1/2 in x W. 26 1/4 in, H. 82.6 cm x W. 66.7 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Sookee Chung
Department: Korean Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 2017.16
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 23

Description

Label:

These three bojagi works  [2017.14, 2017.15, 2017.16) were made for a bride’s wedding trousseau in the 1930s or earlier. The bride was the daughter of a textile studio owner in Seoul. Making bojagi to wrap precious wedding presents has been a very common practice since the Joseon dynasty and continues today. These three works demonstrate well how a bojagi was created originally, made from remnants of clothing, bedding, or other fabric. These were made of leftovers or discarded fabric pieces from the family’s store.

The bojagi on the left [2017.15] was made with the border remnants of different fabrics. The Classical Chinese characters mean “fortune” and “longevity.” It is interesting to discover stamps saying “silk made in Japan” on this bojagi— it proves the exchanges of fabric during the Japanese colonization period in Korea. The middle one shows several floral and cloud patterns from the remnants. The silk of the middle bojagi [2017.14] is thick, suggesting that the fabric was used for winter clothing.

The bojagi on the right [2017.16] is stamped or glued with a gold horse motif and several characters. The inscriptions provide valuable information about the kinds of fabrics used. The three Chinese characters (mobondan), paired with horse motifs, identify those pieces as border strips; the nine-character inscriptions on blue fabric tell us specifically that they are border strips from special silk made in Yeongheung. Yeongheung is located in what is today North Korea, and was famous for its silk production during the Joseon dynasty; written records state that the royal fabric workshop used special silk made in the region


Label:

These three bojagi works  [2017.14, 2017.15, 2017.16) were made for a bride’s wedding trousseau in the 1930s or earlier. The bride was the daughter of a textile studio owner in Seoul. Making bojagi to wrap precious wedding presents has been a very common practice since the Joseon dynasty and continues today. These three works demonstrate well how a bojagi was created originally, made from remnants of clothing, bedding, or other fabric. These were made of leftovers or discarded fabric pieces from the family’s store.

The bojagi on the left [2017.15] was made with the border remnants of different fabrics. The Classical Chinese characters mean “fortune” and “longevity.” It is interesting to discover stamps saying “silk made in Japan” on this bojagi— it proves the exchanges of fabric during the Japanese colonization period in Korea. The middle one shows several floral and cloud patterns from the remnants. The silk of the middle bojagi [2017.14] is thick, suggesting that the fabric was used for winter clothing.

The bojagi on the right [2017.16] is stamped or glued with a gold horse motif and several characters. The inscriptions provide valuable information about the kinds of fabrics used. The three Chinese characters (mobondan), paired with horse motifs, identify those pieces as border strips; the nine-character inscriptions on blue fabric tell us specifically that they are border strips from special silk made in Yeongheung. Yeongheung is located in what is today North Korea, and was famous for its silk production during the Joseon dynasty; written records state that the royal fabric workshop used special silk made in the region


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