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Pine Lodge amid Tall Mountains
Date: approx. 1590-1620
Historical Period: Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink on paper
Dimensions: H. 121 1/4 in x W. 38 3/4 in, H. 308 cm x W. 98.4 cm (image); H. 158 in x W. 46 in, H. 401.3 cm x W. 117 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Gift of the Avery Brundage Collection Symposium Fund and the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum Trust Fund
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B69D17
On Display: No

Description

Label:


明代萬曆1604  吳彬  深山逸樂題杜甫詩句    紙本墨色軸


Wu Bin was born in Fujian province and probably had his early training in the style practiced by local professional painters. Some time between 1591 and 1600 he moved to Nanjing, where his talent was noted by members of the imperial court. There he had access to ancient paintings in the imperial collection. Perhaps in part due to this exposure, Wu was a leader in a movement to revive the traditional styles of the Song dynasty (960–1279). Although he was accomplished in a range of styles and types of painting, he is now best known for monumental landscapes with exaggerated compositions and forms, characteristics of a painting tradition associated with the Northern Song dynasty (960–1126). This very large hanging scroll, no doubt created for one of the palatial-sized buildings common in Nanjing, is a creative reworking of the late Ming revival of the monumental landscape painting, with its emphasis is on vertical rock forms. In Wu Bin's version, the tall crag resembles an organism growing in defiance of the earthly law of gravity.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Gems of Chinese Art: From the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection", Hong Kong Museum of Art, 5/17/1983-8/7/1983.

"Masterpieces of Oriental Art from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Kyoto National Museum, 10/17/1995 - 11/26/1995
Label:


明代萬曆1604  吳彬  深山逸樂題杜甫詩句    紙本墨色軸


Wu Bin was born in Fujian province and probably had his early training in the style practiced by local professional painters. Some time between 1591 and 1600 he moved to Nanjing, where his talent was noted by members of the imperial court. There he had access to ancient paintings in the imperial collection. Perhaps in part due to this exposure, Wu was a leader in a movement to revive the traditional styles of the Song dynasty (960–1279). Although he was accomplished in a range of styles and types of painting, he is now best known for monumental landscapes with exaggerated compositions and forms, characteristics of a painting tradition associated with the Northern Song dynasty (960–1126). This very large hanging scroll, no doubt created for one of the palatial-sized buildings common in Nanjing, is a creative reworking of the late Ming revival of the monumental landscape painting, with its emphasis is on vertical rock forms. In Wu Bin's version, the tall crag resembles an organism growing in defiance of the earthly law of gravity.


Exhibition History: "Gems of Chinese Art: From the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection", Hong Kong Museum of Art, 5/17/1983-8/7/1983.

"Masterpieces of Oriental Art from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Kyoto National Museum, 10/17/1995 - 11/26/1995