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Summer Mountains, Misty Rain
王翬 夏山煙雨圖 手卷 紙本水墨 清康熙朝 1668年
Date: 1668
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911), Reign of the Kangxi emperor (1662-1722)
Object Name: Handscroll
Materials: Ink on paper
Dimensions: H. 17 in x W. 97 in, H. 43.1 cm x W. 246.4 cm (image); H. 17 1/4 in x W. 314 3/8 in, H. 43.8 cm x W. 798.5 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Gift of the Tang Foundation, presented by Leslie, Martin, and Nadine Tang in celebration of Jack C.C. Tang's sixtieth birthday
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B87D8
On Display: No

Description

Label:

This painting played a pivotal role in the career of Wang Hui, one of the most famous and influential painters of the late 1600s and early 1700s. It was painted early in Wang's career for one of the most influential art patrons of his time. While in his short inscription Wang feigned indifference, it is obvious he was aware of the possible importance of this painting, which has since been recognized as the major masterpiece of his early career.

It is difficult to comprehend the amount of work and skill that went into creating this long handscroll (you are seeing only a short section here). It begins with a densely painted mountain passage whose execution required almost every skill in the painters' repertoire, and goes on through alternating sections of open waterways and mountains. Not only was the painting masterfully composed, but also the combination of brush strokes and ink was deftly handled. Try counting the number of different types of brush strokes and ink applications in this section. All are combined to capture the essence of a misty summer day in an idealized landscape.


More Information

Exhibition History: "The Life of a Patron: Zhou Lianggong (1612-1672) and the Painters of Seventeenth-Century China", China Institute Gallery, New York, 10/23/1996 - 12/21/1996
"The Southern Crossing: Pictorial Art in 17th Century Nanjing", Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford University, 2/13/2002 - 5/5/2002
"Landscapes Clear and Radiant: The Art of Wang Hui (1632-1717)", The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 9/8/2008 - 1/4/2009
Label:

This painting played a pivotal role in the career of Wang Hui, one of the most famous and influential painters of the late 1600s and early 1700s. It was painted early in Wang's career for one of the most influential art patrons of his time. While in his short inscription Wang feigned indifference, it is obvious he was aware of the possible importance of this painting, which has since been recognized as the major masterpiece of his early career.

It is difficult to comprehend the amount of work and skill that went into creating this long handscroll (you are seeing only a short section here). It begins with a densely painted mountain passage whose execution required almost every skill in the painters' repertoire, and goes on through alternating sections of open waterways and mountains. Not only was the painting masterfully composed, but also the combination of brush strokes and ink was deftly handled. Try counting the number of different types of brush strokes and ink applications in this section. All are combined to capture the essence of a misty summer day in an idealized landscape.


Exhibition History: "The Life of a Patron: Zhou Lianggong (1612-1672) and the Painters of Seventeenth-Century China", China Institute Gallery, New York, 10/23/1996 - 12/21/1996
"The Southern Crossing: Pictorial Art in 17th Century Nanjing", Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford University, 2/13/2002 - 5/5/2002
"Landscapes Clear and Radiant: The Art of Wang Hui (1632-1717)", The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 9/8/2008 - 1/4/2009