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Woman coming out of the bath
石川豊信 風呂上り
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Object Name: Woodblock print (benizuri-e)
Materials: Ink and colors on paper
Dimensions: H. 26 5/8 in x W. 3 7/8 in, H. 67.6 cm x W. 9.8 cm (hashira-e)
Credit Line: Gift of the Grabhorn Ukiyo-e Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 2005.100.18
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Within the slim vertical format of a hashira-e, a beauty reinserts hairpins after her bath. Her naked figure is hastily covered with a chrysanthemum-patterned bathrobe (yokui or yukata), echoing the autumnal theme of the haiku verse inscribed above her head:

Omokage ni
momiji terisō
furo agari

A vision,
glowing with the blush of autumn foliage,
fresh from her bath

The voyeuristic exposure of the upper body and leg, and the precariously covered lower abdomen place this print into the category of abuna-e, or “dangerous pictures.” After the Kyōhō Reforms of 1722 banned the production of pornographic prints (shunga), printmakers adopted alternative means of pleasing their clientele. Instead of explicit representations of sexual acts they depicted partially exposed bodies and sensual facial expressions. The blue color on the robe in this print appears to have been hand applied at a later time.


More Information

Signature/Seal: Signature: 咀篠堂石川秀葩画 Tanjōdō Ishikawa Shūha ga

Collector’s seal: Hayashi Tadamasa
Marks: Publisher’s mark: 板元 hanmoto, with mark of publisher Urokogataya
Exhibition History: “The Printer’s Eye: Ukiyo-e from the Grabhorn Collection”, Asian Art Museum, 2/20/15-5/10/15
Label:

Within the slim vertical format of a hashira-e, a beauty reinserts hairpins after her bath. Her naked figure is hastily covered with a chrysanthemum-patterned bathrobe (yokui or yukata), echoing the autumnal theme of the haiku verse inscribed above her head:

Omokage ni
momiji terisō
furo agari

A vision,
glowing with the blush of autumn foliage,
fresh from her bath

The voyeuristic exposure of the upper body and leg, and the precariously covered lower abdomen place this print into the category of abuna-e, or “dangerous pictures.” After the Kyōhō Reforms of 1722 banned the production of pornographic prints (shunga), printmakers adopted alternative means of pleasing their clientele. Instead of explicit representations of sexual acts they depicted partially exposed bodies and sensual facial expressions. The blue color on the robe in this print appears to have been hand applied at a later time.


Signature/Seal: Signature: 咀篠堂石川秀葩画 Tanjōdō Ishikawa Shūha ga

Collector’s seal: Hayashi Tadamasa
Marks: Publisher’s mark: 板元 hanmoto, with mark of publisher Urokogataya
Exhibition History: “The Printer’s Eye: Ukiyo-e from the Grabhorn Collection”, Asian Art Museum, 2/20/15-5/10/15