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Fan vendor
奥村利信筆 扇売り
Date: approx. 1720s
Object Name: Woodblock print (urushi-e)
Materials: Ink with hand-applied color on paper
Dimensions: H. 13 in x W. 5 7/8 in, H. 33 cm x W. 14.9 cm (hosōban)
Credit Line: Gift of the Grabhorn Ukiyo-e Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 2005.100.13
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Vendors of all kinds plied the streets of Edo, and they are a common subject of both Kabuki and ukiyo-e in the early 1700s. This print portrays a fan vendor, possibly a character familiar from a contemporary Kabuki play. The trailing sleeves of her furisode bear a crest with the kanji for “camellia” (tsubaki) on a black background above an elaborate design of combs and other hair ornaments interspersed with the characters for geese (kari) and good fortune (kichi). Stepping forward, she raises one hand to steady the heavy case on her back, labeled with the shop name, Mieidō. Boxes holding pre-cut paper and bamboo ribs for making fans are piled above her head, while folded and open fans inserted at the top and sides help to advertise her wares, as does the round butterfly crest fan she holds in one hand.

In this urushi-e, or lacquer picture, a mixture of ink and glue create a lustrous surface effect, making the black sleeves of the garment in this print stand out against the other hand-applied pigments. The front of the robe is further embellished with brass filings.


More Information

Signature/Seal: Signature: 大和畫工奥村利信筆 Yamato gakō Okumura Toshinobu hitsu

Artist’s seal: unidentified

Collectors’ seals: two unknown collector’s seals (verso)
Exhibition History: “The Printer’s Eye: Ukiyo-e from the Grabhorn Collection”, Asian Art Museum, 2/20/15-5/10/15
Label:

Vendors of all kinds plied the streets of Edo, and they are a common subject of both Kabuki and ukiyo-e in the early 1700s. This print portrays a fan vendor, possibly a character familiar from a contemporary Kabuki play. The trailing sleeves of her furisode bear a crest with the kanji for “camellia” (tsubaki) on a black background above an elaborate design of combs and other hair ornaments interspersed with the characters for geese (kari) and good fortune (kichi). Stepping forward, she raises one hand to steady the heavy case on her back, labeled with the shop name, Mieidō. Boxes holding pre-cut paper and bamboo ribs for making fans are piled above her head, while folded and open fans inserted at the top and sides help to advertise her wares, as does the round butterfly crest fan she holds in one hand.

In this urushi-e, or lacquer picture, a mixture of ink and glue create a lustrous surface effect, making the black sleeves of the garment in this print stand out against the other hand-applied pigments. The front of the robe is further embellished with brass filings.


Signature/Seal: Signature: 大和畫工奥村利信筆 Yamato gakō Okumura Toshinobu hitsu

Artist’s seal: unidentified

Collectors’ seals: two unknown collector’s seals (verso)
Exhibition History: “The Printer’s Eye: Ukiyo-e from the Grabhorn Collection”, Asian Art Museum, 2/20/15-5/10/15