Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
The transmission of the teachings of the Gelugpa Sect
Place of Origin: China, Beijing
Date: 1800-1900
Object Name: Thangka
Materials: Ink, colors, and gold on cotton
Dimensions: H. 24 1/16 in x W. 17 1/4 in, H. 61.1 cm x W. 43.8 cm (image), H. 49 x W. 31 1/2 in (overall)
Credit Line: Transfer from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Gift of Katherine Ball
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B72D66
On Display: No

Description

Label:

In Tibetan Buddhism, the relationship between a teacher and his students is important, and it is also important that one understands one's lineage and knows from whom the teachings are transmitted. This painting shows the transmission of the teachings through lines of gold. A gold line issuing from the preaching figure of the Future Buddha Maitreya widens into a cloud form supporting Tsong Kapa, the founder of the Gelug sect, and his two disciples. From the three, three lines of gold form into one and descend on the head of a monk shown in the lower left hand corner of the painting. From him, the teaching goes to his eight followers.

The monk is offering a white scarf and a golden mandala to his teachers. Before him are some more votive gifts, including a lare wish-granting gem, a gold ingot, and two hide containers of tea on which are draped bolts of brocade. Yama, wrathful protector of the Gelug sect, is seen enveloped in flames on the lower right corner.


More Information

Exhibition History: "The Place of Provenance: Regional Styles", Rubin Museum of Art, October 12, 2012 - March 25, 2013
Label:

In Tibetan Buddhism, the relationship between a teacher and his students is important, and it is also important that one understands one's lineage and knows from whom the teachings are transmitted. This painting shows the transmission of the teachings through lines of gold. A gold line issuing from the preaching figure of the Future Buddha Maitreya widens into a cloud form supporting Tsong Kapa, the founder of the Gelug sect, and his two disciples. From the three, three lines of gold form into one and descend on the head of a monk shown in the lower left hand corner of the painting. From him, the teaching goes to his eight followers.

The monk is offering a white scarf and a golden mandala to his teachers. Before him are some more votive gifts, including a lare wish-granting gem, a gold ingot, and two hide containers of tea on which are draped bolts of brocade. Yama, wrathful protector of the Gelug sect, is seen enveloped in flames on the lower right corner.


Exhibition History: "The Place of Provenance: Regional Styles", Rubin Museum of Art, October 12, 2012 - March 25, 2013