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Raja Heera Singh
Portraits of The Princes and People of India
Date: 1844
Object Name: Chromolithograph
Materials: Hand-painted chromolithograph on paper
Dimensions: H. 23 in x W. 17 1/2 in, H. 58.4 cm x W. 44.4 cm
Credit Line: Gift of the Kapany Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 1998.63.7
On Display: No
Culture: Sikh

Description

Label: Various power struggles marked the years following the death of Maharaja Ranjit Singh (1780–1839), founder of the first unified Sikh kingdom. Hira (Heera) Singh, shown in this portrait, was the son of Ranjit Singh’s chief minister and had been treated like a son by the maharaja. In 1843 Hira Singh’s powerful father was murdered during a rampage in the Sikh capital of Lahore (Pakistan) that also claimed, among others, the life of Ranjit Singh’s son Sher Singh, whose portrait is on view nearby. The Sikh army, with Hira at its head, eventually recaptured Lahore and installed another of Ranjit Singh’s sons upon the throne. Hira Singh was appointed chief minister, a position that he held for only one year before he too was murdered as a result of court intrigues. This rendering of the powerful young leader conveys his authority and force of personality.

More Information

Inscriptions: Print Sellers by Special Appointment to Her Majesty and H.R.H. the Duchess of Kent
Exhibition History: "The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms", Royal Ontario Museum, 5/25/2000 - 8/20/2000

"Saints and Kings: Arts, Culture, and Legacy of the Sikhs", Asian Art Museum, 3/10/2017 - 6/18/2017
Label: Various power struggles marked the years following the death of Maharaja Ranjit Singh (1780–1839), founder of the first unified Sikh kingdom. Hira (Heera) Singh, shown in this portrait, was the son of Ranjit Singh’s chief minister and had been treated like a son by the maharaja. In 1843 Hira Singh’s powerful father was murdered during a rampage in the Sikh capital of Lahore (Pakistan) that also claimed, among others, the life of Ranjit Singh’s son Sher Singh, whose portrait is on view nearby. The Sikh army, with Hira at its head, eventually recaptured Lahore and installed another of Ranjit Singh’s sons upon the throne. Hira Singh was appointed chief minister, a position that he held for only one year before he too was murdered as a result of court intrigues. This rendering of the powerful young leader conveys his authority and force of personality.
Inscriptions: Print Sellers by Special Appointment to Her Majesty and H.R.H. the Duchess of Kent
Exhibition History: "The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms", Royal Ontario Museum, 5/25/2000 - 8/20/2000

"Saints and Kings: Arts, Culture, and Legacy of the Sikhs", Asian Art Museum, 3/10/2017 - 6/18/2017