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Skirt
Place of Origin: Philippines, Mindanao
Dimensions: H. 52 1/2 in x W. 25 1/2 in, H. 133.3 cm x W. 64.8 cm
Credit Line: Gift of the Black family in memory of Rev. and Mrs. Robert F. Black
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 2011.63
On Display: Yes
Location: Tateuchi Thematic Gallery
Culture: Bagobo people

Description

Label:

The most prestigious of Bagobo textiles is the three-panel skirt, which consists of two “child” panels surrounding an elaborately patterned central or “mother” panel. During important feasts, unmarried women wear these skirts, which indicate their weaving skill and their family’s prestige. Today, because such textiles are rarely woven and few older textiles remain, families borrow from one another to assemble complete ensembles of skirt, jacket, and other adornments.

The Bagobo and their neighbors the T’boli and Blaan are skilled weavers of abaca, a type of banana plant. The process of making a textile from the fibers of a banana leaf is difficult and time consuming. The strands would be separated from the leaf, dried, softened, and then tied one by one into a continuous thread. These threads would be dyed by the ikat technique, in which threads are bundled and then tied with wax-coated threads to protect those areas from absorbing dye. The pattern is dyed into the individual strands before the textile is woven. Today few weavers continue this laborious process, but many families treasure older textiles as heirlooms.

COMMUNITY VOICE

The Bagobo clothing and textiles from the south resonate with me because I’m from Mindanao. I’ve seen the people who wore these textiles and their rituals, and I’ve seen the metalworks from southern Mindanao. I like the mix in this exhibition of the very precolonial bulul and the metalwork and tribal clothing, and then you go through the start of the colonial period with the santos, and on to the European-inspired paintings, and end with the contemporary.

Esther Chavez
President, Philippine American Press Club U.S.A.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018
Label:

The most prestigious of Bagobo textiles is the three-panel skirt, which consists of two “child” panels surrounding an elaborately patterned central or “mother” panel. During important feasts, unmarried women wear these skirts, which indicate their weaving skill and their family’s prestige. Today, because such textiles are rarely woven and few older textiles remain, families borrow from one another to assemble complete ensembles of skirt, jacket, and other adornments.

The Bagobo and their neighbors the T’boli and Blaan are skilled weavers of abaca, a type of banana plant. The process of making a textile from the fibers of a banana leaf is difficult and time consuming. The strands would be separated from the leaf, dried, softened, and then tied one by one into a continuous thread. These threads would be dyed by the ikat technique, in which threads are bundled and then tied with wax-coated threads to protect those areas from absorbing dye. The pattern is dyed into the individual strands before the textile is woven. Today few weavers continue this laborious process, but many families treasure older textiles as heirlooms.

COMMUNITY VOICE

The Bagobo clothing and textiles from the south resonate with me because I’m from Mindanao. I’ve seen the people who wore these textiles and their rituals, and I’ve seen the metalworks from southern Mindanao. I like the mix in this exhibition of the very precolonial bulul and the metalwork and tribal clothing, and then you go through the start of the colonial period with the santos, and on to the European-inspired paintings, and end with the contemporary.

Esther Chavez
President, Philippine American Press Club U.S.A.


Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018