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Blanket (binakol)
Place of Origin: Philippines, Abra Province, Luzon island
Date: approx. 1900-1930
Materials: cotton
Dimensions: H. 59 1/2 in x W. 76 1/2 in, H. 151.1 cm W. 194.3 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Merrill Randol Sherwin and Dr. Stephen A. Sherwin
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 2014.11
On Display: Yes
Location: Tateuchi Thematic Gallery
Culture: Itneg people

Description

Label: The interlocked patterns of textiles made by Itneg weavers create mesmerizing optical illusions and were said to protect the owner by warding off evil. These textiles have both practical and ritual uses. They could be used as blankets, and old photographs show them worn as mantles over men’s shoulders. On ceremonial occasions, they would be hung on bamboo structures built as shrines both within and outside of houses. At funerals they were displayed around the deceased, distracting malevolent spirits who were said to become occupied in counting the threads. Textiles helped demarcate sacred spaces, and were themselves used as offerings to the unseen world, displayed during important ceremonies so that their very appearance would attract and appease benevolent spirits and repel malevolent ones.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018
Label: The interlocked patterns of textiles made by Itneg weavers create mesmerizing optical illusions and were said to protect the owner by warding off evil. These textiles have both practical and ritual uses. They could be used as blankets, and old photographs show them worn as mantles over men’s shoulders. On ceremonial occasions, they would be hung on bamboo structures built as shrines both within and outside of houses. At funerals they were displayed around the deceased, distracting malevolent spirits who were said to become occupied in counting the threads. Textiles helped demarcate sacred spaces, and were themselves used as offerings to the unseen world, displayed during important ceremonies so that their very appearance would attract and appease benevolent spirits and repel malevolent ones.
Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018