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The Virgin Mary as Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception
Place of Origin: Philippines
Date: perhaps 1650-1800
Materials: Wood, pigments, metal, ivory, and human hair
Dimensions: H. 21 in x W. 10 1/2 in x D. 3 3/4 in, H. 53.3 cm x W. 26.7 cm x D. 9.5 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Taylor and Julia Moore
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: 2016.278.a-.e
On Display: Yes
Location: Tateuchi Thematic Gallery

Description

Label:

A great portent appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.
—The Book of Revelation 12:1

This statue represents Mary of the Immaculate Conception (La Purisima Concepcion) appearing in the heavens above a crescent moon. This form of the Virgin Mary is popular in the Philippines and is the patron saint of many villages. The statue’s head and hands are made of ivory, while the body is wooden.

The tradition of making santo (saint) images of angels, saints, Mary, and Jesus was common in Spain and spread to many of the colonized territories. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish where a statue was made. Early Spanish reports describe artists of Chinese descent as well as Filipino artists carving these images in the Philippines.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018
Label:

A great portent appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.
—The Book of Revelation 12:1

This statue represents Mary of the Immaculate Conception (La Purisima Concepcion) appearing in the heavens above a crescent moon. This form of the Virgin Mary is popular in the Philippines and is the patron saint of many villages. The statue’s head and hands are made of ivory, while the body is wooden.

The tradition of making santo (saint) images of angels, saints, Mary, and Jesus was common in Spain and spread to many of the colonized territories. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish where a statue was made. Early Spanish reports describe artists of Chinese descent as well as Filipino artists carving these images in the Philippines.


Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018