Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
The Buddhist deities Sitasamvara and Vajrayogini
Place of Origin: China, Beijing
Date: 1800-1900
Object Name: Thangka
Materials: Colors on cotton
Dimensions: H. 39.5 in x W. 26 7/8 in, H. 103.3 cm x W. 68.3 cm (image); H. 42 in x W. 26 in, H. 106.7 cm x W. 66 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Transfer from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Gift of Albert M. Bender
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B78D3
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 12

Description

Label:

The fierce female Vajrayogini appears here in sexual embrace with her consort, the Buddha Sitasamvara. Their embrace as male and female symbolizes the union of Buddhist opposites such as compassion and wisdom, or emptiness and appearance.

Sitasamvara’s hands are crossed in the gesture of highest energy (vajrahumkara), while holding two vases filled with the elixir of immortality. Vajrayogini is painted red to symbolize passion, and in her uplifted hands are two skull bowls. The intensity of her expression also reveals the ferocity of this female deity.


Label:

The fierce female Vajrayogini appears here in sexual embrace with her consort, the Buddha Sitasamvara. Their embrace as male and female symbolizes the union of Buddhist opposites such as compassion and wisdom, or emptiness and appearance.

Sitasamvara’s hands are crossed in the gesture of highest energy (vajrahumkara), while holding two vases filled with the elixir of immortality. Vajrayogini is painted red to symbolize passion, and in her uplifted hands are two skull bowls. The intensity of her expression also reveals the ferocity of this female deity.