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The Buddhist deity Green Tara
Place of Origin: Tibet
Date: 1700-1800
Object Name: Thangka
Materials: Ink and colors on cotton
Dimensions: H. 31 1/4 in x W. 20 1/2 in, H. 79.4 cm x W. 52.1 cm (image); H. 59 in x W. 35 1/2 in, H. 149.9 cm x W. 90.2 cm (overall)
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B60D18+
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 12

Description

Label:

Green Tara is a deity so active and decisive that her demeanor verges on ferocity. Since she helps worshipers to overcome otherwise intractable obstacles, Green Tara is widely venerated for her ability to accomplish goals. Moreover, she protects her followers from all that threatens life, health, prosperity, and peace of mind. In the center of this painting Green Tara sits on a moon disk above a lotus pedestal. She, surrounded by many smaller manifestations of Tara, sits in the posture of ease with one foot pendent. In her left hand she holds a lotus, which symbolizes compassion, and her right hand is lowered in the gift-granting gesture.

Tsongkhapa, founder of the Gelug Order of Tibetan Buddhism, presides over the entire scene from above. He is surrounded by eight figures whose legs, folded in the meditative pose, identify them as bodhisattvas. The guardian kings of the four directions are shown at bottom, while the deities Black and Red Mahakala flank them.


Label:

Green Tara is a deity so active and decisive that her demeanor verges on ferocity. Since she helps worshipers to overcome otherwise intractable obstacles, Green Tara is widely venerated for her ability to accomplish goals. Moreover, she protects her followers from all that threatens life, health, prosperity, and peace of mind. In the center of this painting Green Tara sits on a moon disk above a lotus pedestal. She, surrounded by many smaller manifestations of Tara, sits in the posture of ease with one foot pendent. In her left hand she holds a lotus, which symbolizes compassion, and her right hand is lowered in the gift-granting gesture.

Tsongkhapa, founder of the Gelug Order of Tibetan Buddhism, presides over the entire scene from above. He is surrounded by eight figures whose legs, folded in the meditative pose, identify them as bodhisattvas. The guardian kings of the four directions are shown at bottom, while the deities Black and Red Mahakala flank them.