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Festivities of the twelve months
Place of Origin: Japan
Date: 1700-1750
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Object Name: Handscroll
Materials: Ink and colors on paper
Dimensions: H. 10 1/4 in x W. 272 1/4 in, H. 26 cm x W. 691.5 cm (overall), H. 10 1/4 in x W. 265 3/4 in, H. 26 cm x W. 675 cm (image)
Credit Line: Donated by Mr. and Mrs. Lucius H. Horiuchi in memory of Mrs. Horiuchi's parents: Admiral and Mrs. Charles Maynard Cooke
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B86D19
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Flowers for show

This handscroll depicts twelve scenes, each corresponding to a month in the lunar calendar. This particular scene of the Chrysanthemum Festival, which represents the ninth month, shows a gathering of people viewing different varieties of cultivated chrysanthemums. In addition to flower viewing, people are engaged in various social activities, such as conversing, enjoying tea, or just people watching.

Chrysanthemums were one of the most popular flowers among gardeners during the Edo period in Japan. Growers selectively bred the flowers to achieve unique and unusual blooms; many of these breeds would be unrecognizable to modern eyes, as they no longer exist. The gardeners presented these horticultural marvels for public appreciation on the day of the Chrysanthemum Festival. The festival is still celebrated today in Japan.

In this way, the Japanese celebrate the chrysanthemum in its cultivated form, unlike their tradition of cherryblossom viewing, in which they appreciate the cherry flower in its natural state.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017
Label:

Flowers for show

This handscroll depicts twelve scenes, each corresponding to a month in the lunar calendar. This particular scene of the Chrysanthemum Festival, which represents the ninth month, shows a gathering of people viewing different varieties of cultivated chrysanthemums. In addition to flower viewing, people are engaged in various social activities, such as conversing, enjoying tea, or just people watching.

Chrysanthemums were one of the most popular flowers among gardeners during the Edo period in Japan. Growers selectively bred the flowers to achieve unique and unusual blooms; many of these breeds would be unrecognizable to modern eyes, as they no longer exist. The gardeners presented these horticultural marvels for public appreciation on the day of the Chrysanthemum Festival. The festival is still celebrated today in Japan.

In this way, the Japanese celebrate the chrysanthemum in its cultivated form, unlike their tradition of cherryblossom viewing, in which they appreciate the cherry flower in its natural state.


Exhibition History: "Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017