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Summer lotus
惲壽平 擬北宋徐崇嗣荷花圖 立軸 絹本設色 清康熙朝 1688年
Date: dated 1688
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Colors on silk
Dimensions: H. 66 1/2 in x W. 28 7/8 in, H. 168.9 cm x W. 73.3 cm (image); H. 93 1/4 in x W. 39 in, H. 236.9 cm x W. 99.1 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Museum purchase
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B69D5
On Display: No

Description

Label:

清朝年惲壽平繪紅瞝港粉粉塘圖焈絹本痓綎

The lotus is the flower of the sixth month, the flower of summer. It is a symbol of purity because the flower emerges from the mud unstained. As such, the lotus is also known as qinglian, a pun for "incorruptible" (qinglian) officials. It was referred to in a famous eleventh-century essay as the "gentleman among flowers.

Artist's biography:
Yun Shouping was born to a poor family. Little is known about his early training, but he was reputed to have started painting beautiful flowers at age eight. While his writings suggest an interest in landscape painting in the styles practiced by the scholar elite, he is best known for paintings of flowers. It is likely his early training came from a local school of flower painters, but he took the genre to a level not reached since the Song dynasty (960–1279). He prided himself on his extreme poverty but traveled in the company of the most famous (and wealthy) members of the educated elite. He was a close friend of Wang Hui (see the joint hanging scroll also on display in this gallery) and reportedly chose to paint flowers since he felt he could not compete with that master in painting landscapes. A popular story has it that Yun Shouping left his family so poor at the time of his death that they could not afford a proper funeral and that Wang Hui offered to pay for it.


More Information

Signature/Seal: 戊辰初夏/擬北宋徐崇嗣/白雲溪漁壽平
After Xu Chongci (徐熙 937-975) of N. Song, early summer in the year wuchen (1668), by Baiyun xi yu (white-cloudy stream, fisherman) Shouping


Inscriptions: 如有薰風起硯池 /鮮霞猶護半開枝/露濕紅衣散金粉/澂香殘夜納涼持
This is a poem to describe the painting and accompanies the depiction, this was typical as there was poetry in painting and painting in poetry.
A brief literary, but not poetic, translation:
As if the wind blows scents from my inkstone如有薰風起硯池
brilliant red/colors attaining semi-blossomed branches鮮霞猶護半開枝
exposing a red coating splashed with gold露濕紅衣散金粉
the sweet scent is perfect for enjoying the cool night 澂香殘夜納涼持

Exhibition History: "Gems of Chinese Art: From the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection", Hong Kong Museum of Art, 5/17/1983-8/7/1983.

"The Hundred Flowers: Botanical Motifs in Chinese Art", Asian Art Museum, March 24-June 25, 1985
"Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017
Label:

清朝年惲壽平繪紅瞝港粉粉塘圖焈絹本痓綎

The lotus is the flower of the sixth month, the flower of summer. It is a symbol of purity because the flower emerges from the mud unstained. As such, the lotus is also known as qinglian, a pun for "incorruptible" (qinglian) officials. It was referred to in a famous eleventh-century essay as the "gentleman among flowers.

Artist's biography:
Yun Shouping was born to a poor family. Little is known about his early training, but he was reputed to have started painting beautiful flowers at age eight. While his writings suggest an interest in landscape painting in the styles practiced by the scholar elite, he is best known for paintings of flowers. It is likely his early training came from a local school of flower painters, but he took the genre to a level not reached since the Song dynasty (960–1279). He prided himself on his extreme poverty but traveled in the company of the most famous (and wealthy) members of the educated elite. He was a close friend of Wang Hui (see the joint hanging scroll also on display in this gallery) and reportedly chose to paint flowers since he felt he could not compete with that master in painting landscapes. A popular story has it that Yun Shouping left his family so poor at the time of his death that they could not afford a proper funeral and that Wang Hui offered to pay for it.


Signature/Seal: 戊辰初夏/擬北宋徐崇嗣/白雲溪漁壽平
After Xu Chongci (徐熙 937-975) of N. Song, early summer in the year wuchen (1668), by Baiyun xi yu (white-cloudy stream, fisherman) Shouping


Inscriptions: 如有薰風起硯池 /鮮霞猶護半開枝/露濕紅衣散金粉/澂香殘夜納涼持
This is a poem to describe the painting and accompanies the depiction, this was typical as there was poetry in painting and painting in poetry.
A brief literary, but not poetic, translation:
As if the wind blows scents from my inkstone如有薰風起硯池
brilliant red/colors attaining semi-blossomed branches鮮霞猶護半開枝
exposing a red coating splashed with gold露濕紅衣散金粉
the sweet scent is perfect for enjoying the cool night 澂香殘夜納涼持

Exhibition History: "Gems of Chinese Art: From the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection", Hong Kong Museum of Art, 5/17/1983-8/7/1983.

"The Hundred Flowers: Botanical Motifs in Chinese Art", Asian Art Museum, March 24-June 25, 1985
"Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017