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Horse head
Place of Origin: China, Central Plains
Date: approx. 206-100 BCE
Historical Period: Western Han dynasty (206 BCE-9 CE)
Object Name: Tomb figure
Materials: Gray low-fired ceramic painted in red, purple, and white
Dimensions: H. 1 13/16 in x W. 1 7/8 in x D. 5 1/8 in, H. 4.6 cm x W. 4.9 cm x D. 13.0 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B76P14
On Display: No

Description

Label: Horses were employed for warfare as early as the Shang-Zhou period. King Wu Ling of the Zhao state (325-299 BC) established the use of cavalry in northern China. The great enthusiasm for horses during the Han was further stimulated by the many breeds of horses imported from Western Asia and models were made in a variety of materials. Of these models, individual horse heads formed one type of funerary article and have been excavated from tombs of the Warring States through the Eastern Han period. The slim-shaped head and vivid facial details seen here recall the precise modeling techniques attributed to northern workshops of the early Han.
Label: Horses were employed for warfare as early as the Shang-Zhou period. King Wu Ling of the Zhao state (325-299 BC) established the use of cavalry in northern China. The great enthusiasm for horses during the Han was further stimulated by the many breeds of horses imported from Western Asia and models were made in a variety of materials. Of these models, individual horse heads formed one type of funerary article and have been excavated from tombs of the Warring States through the Eastern Han period. The slim-shaped head and vivid facial details seen here recall the precise modeling techniques attributed to northern workshops of the early Han.